Engineers at the University of Nairobi, Kenya, will write their names in history when the country’s first satellite launches into the International Space Station this month.

The 1Kun-PF was built by Kenyans with $1million in funding from the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency.

With a size of 10 cubic cm and a weight between 1 and 10kg, the nano-satellite will have the task of protecting the country’s borders and supervising agricultural activities.

It has the same operational capabilities as conventional satellites and it would be easier to put into orbit, according to Kenyan officials.

“We are committed to make every effort to prepare for the deployment of the first satellite of the Republic of Kenya, using the unique capabilities of the Japanese Experimental Module,”┬ásaid one official quoted.

The Kenyan engineers who made this machine are the first African team to benefit from the joint United Nations-JAXA project to support developing countries’ learning institutions in the manufacture of their own satellites.

With this innovation, Kenya becomes one of six African countries with satellites in space.

Egypt, South Africa, Algeria, Ghana and Nigeria already have theirs.

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