Short fuse? 5 reasons why you should keep calm

There are situations that make you jump out of your skin. Preferably the one you consider abnormal and deliberately incited. Yet you prefer to keep your head cool, according to the medical world.

And for these 5 reasons you should keep calm:

Momp pots sleep worse

For those who are angry, the amygdala, the part of the brain that manages our primal instincts, goes into overdrive. Because it translates your anger as panic, the blood flow to your heart and limbs will rise. This makes relaxation – and therefore sleep – almost impossible. So do not crawl into bed, but make a note of what makes you so angry on a piece of paper. That clears your head, so your anger will fade away.

Anger causes headache

And not only the blood supply increases when you are angry. More of the stress cortisol hormones, adrenaline and testosterone are also released. They push your body into fight or flight mode and cause the blood vessels and nerves that surround your brain to swell. The pressure that this creates can sometimes lead to a headache. A British study that looked at the behavior of 422 adults, showed that those who regularly reported suffering from headache also scored significantly higher on the ‘anger scale’.

You get sick faster

Too much of the stress cortisol hormone can bring your sugar level out of balance, suppress the functioning of the thyroid gland and can even reduce bone density, according to a study by the University of Southampton.

Short fuse? 5 reasons why you should keep calm

Initially, the substance triggers an anti-inflammatory response in the immune system, but when the hormone is present in the body in high concentrations for a long time, it makes it more susceptible to viruses.

It becomes harder to digest your food

Once the flight-or-fight mechanism is activated, the blood flow to areas such as the limbs needed to take action is increased. That is why our digestive system has to do with a little less so that the good intestinal bacteria receive less oxygen and possibly die. And that has its effect on digestion.

It makes you anxious and depressed

When we are angry, our heart rate and muscle tension increase: the body is in the highest state of readiness. If this reaction occurs frequently, it makes it more difficult for the brain to switch off the neurons that are activated during this reaction. As a result, the feeling of anger lingers, while the presence of happiness hormone serotonin shrinks.

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