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Top 5 women who have Alopecia and embraced their baldness

Alopecia is a disease-causing a decrease in the amount of hair that can even result in their disappearance. There are many types of Alopecia. Several factors can cause it—notably, genetics or factors such as stress and hormonal changes.

For some people, especially ladies, this chronic hair loss has been so debilitating, embarrassing, painful, scary, depressing, and lonely. Still, these women below took off their wigs and said: I am done with hiding.

Top five courageous women who reveal and embraced their baldness

1. Farah Mohidin

jewelry designer Farah Mohidin
©Stewart Williams/The Sun – Jewelry designer Farah Mohidin

The jewelry designer Farah Mohidin, 26, was ashamed of her Alopecia until her 27-year-old boyfriend, Ben Allison, a musician, helped her accept it. Now she sells wealth-inspired jewelry.

Mohidin from Richmond, South West London, says: “At the age of seven, I started to lose a small amount of my hair. My mother used styles such as side partings and pigtails to hide them. By the time I turned 15, I was completely bald and had been diagnosed with baldness. I was desperate. I wore wigs that never looked right and tried hats to distract others. The girls ostracized me, and the boys couldn’t understand how anyone my age would need a wig.”

“As part of my last project, I designed a range of jewelry, including necklaces, earrings, and baseball caps made of silver wire that opened my head based on my experience of Alopecia.”

In 2018, Farah met her boyfriend Ben. Ben thinks that Farah is beautiful with or without a wig. “He inspired me to become hairless and gave me the confidence that I could start my own jewelry business.”

Last year, I took my wig off for the first time in public and was terrified. Now I am not looking back. I want to show girls fighting hair loss that they are prettier. You can achieve your goals with or without hair.

2. Jasmine Ogunbodede

Jasmine Ogunbodede "The Witch"
©BBC – Jasmine Ogunbodede “The Witch”

“The witch” is what she has been called for several years because of the disease. Her real name is Jasmine Ogunbodede, is a young Nigerian woman with total Alopecia. Unfortunately, this earned her the stigmatization of everyone.

The head without the slightest hair, because of the disease, Jasmine has managed to brave all obstacles and become an ambassador for all the people who are victims of all the beating of the genre.

Today, Jasmine launched a foundation against stigma and for the empowerment of people with Alopecia. She thus wishes to educate as many people as possible about this disease.

3. Christala Fletcher

Top 5 women who have Alopecia and embraced their baldness
©Stewart Williams/The Sun – Christala Fletcher

Fletcher Christala from Greenford, West London, suffers from Alopecia Areata- also known as spot alopecia. Her condition prompted her to start a wig business in 2017. Crystal, 27, says: “I was nine when my hair started falling out in pieces the size of a coin.”

“As I grew older, there were more, and my mother took me to the doctor. After a blood test, I was diagnosed with ‘alopecia’, an autoimmune disease often associated with stress. In high school, I wore wigs because I had large bald spots. But they never fit and were prickly.” Hooligans made her feel like a freak.

When she was 17 years old, Christala developed a blood infection and had to have a transfusion. After that, her hair grew into small bundles. “I would cover it with headscarves and wigs. But when I turned 20, my sister Helen convinced me to shave.”

“I love that I can help people with Alopecia, victims of trauma, people who are naturally bald, and patients with chemotherapy. In most cases, I am bald, but on other days I wear one of my own wigs. I have had the honor of having this choice.”

4. Caulette Campbell

Top 5 women who have Alopecia and embraced their baldness
©Stewart Williams – Caulette Campbell

Caulette Campbell began to suffer from Alopecia when she was 15 years old and has since taken up Burlesque dancing. The Salary Manager, 37, from Darlington, says: “When I was 15, I got the flu and almost immediately felt bad”.

“My hair started to fall out, and I used a whole range of unusual hairstyles to hide my bald hair. When I took my final exams, my hair fell out completely because of the stress of studying and exams. My hair grew back rarely and then fell out without warning. I wore wigs and headscarves – this really affected my social life.”

Ten years ago, a friend of hers, who used to do burlesque in Newcastle, constantly persuaded Caulette to come to class. In the end, she gave up, and that was the best thing she ever did.

Campell wasn’t a “bald girl” on stage, she was a glamorous performer who was applauded. The lack of hair should not deter you. “I am a bald burlesque Beauty and proud.”

5. Adriana Gambardella

Top 5 women who have Alopecia and embraced their baldness
©The Sun – Adriana Gambardella

39-year-old Adriana Gambardelle, from Edinburgh, was diagnosed with Alopecia at the age of nine. This inspired her to become a cancer researcher. Adriana, whose shopkeeper boyfriend, Daryl Bertram, says: “When I was nine years old, I started losing small strands of hair”.

By the time Adriana was 12, her hair, eyebrows, and eyelashes had fallen out completely. Tests showed that she had Alopecia Universalis, an extreme autoimmune disease that affects the hair follicles of your body, leaving you without hair. “My mother bought me a wig, but it was not well fitted, and I was constantly being targeted by school bullies.”

She was always chosen last for team sports, children avoided her, and her self-esteem fell dramatically. While studying biology at university, Adriana dropped her wig and put on scarves and hats. “I focused on my studies and thought I was ugly.”

At 27 years old, she met Philippe, who was two years older than her. They got married in 2007 after a year of getting to know each other. “But we got divorced in 2010.” Reasons: Her Alopecia and low self-esteem.

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